#84 October 2020 Update on My T1D Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) using Humalog and Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

My new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, is available in the U.S. on Amazon and internationally on your countries’ Amazon in both Kindle and Print versions. The book incorporates all the new strategies that I learned since my previous book that has allowed me to achieve truly normal blood sugars. It also describes why blood sugars can be so difficult to regulate with T1D without these strategies. The ‘Look Inside’ feature on Amazon will allow you to read the Table of Contents and the first two chapters of the book which gives a complete overview of the book contents. My other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

Lift of the Month – October 2020

Lift Of The Month, October 2020, 61 kg Snatch, M60 73 kg BW

Glycemic Results For October 2020

In October 2020, my glycemic results were improved compared to September. My mean blood glucose was 97 mg/dl and a standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) was 18 mg/dl. The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for October 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Table 2.3 below. I set my goal standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) to ≤ 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l), although normal is ≤ 25.2 mg/dl (1.4 mmol/l).

The table below shows my bodyweight at the end of the month, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I take to supplement my Tresiba dose to adjust for the variations in my bedtime blood glucose. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the COV%, the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 70 mg/dl, between 70 and 130 mg/dl, and > 130 mg/dl. My goal is to have 100% my of blood glucose values fall in the range 70−130 mg/dl. I did not have any hypoglycemic episodes or need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties™) this month.

The graph below shows my breath acetone measurements for the month of October 2020. I use the Ketonix® acetone meter which was gifted to me by Michel Lundell, the inventor of Ketonix® in 2015. It has been working for the past 5 years and is an economical way to monitor ketosis. Ketonix® readings between 25% and 50% are consistent with nutritional ketosis.

My current macronutrients are: 40 grams total carbs (5% of energy) of which 12 grams is fiber, 170 grams protein (28% of energy, 2.3 grams/kg BW/day), and 189 grams fat (67% of energy) or 2,497 kcal/day. The ketogenic ratio (KR) of my diet is 1.57. In 1980, Withrow published the equation for the KR as follows: KR = (0.9 F + 0.46 P) ÷ (C + 0.58 P + 0.1 F), where F is grams of dietary fat, P is grams of dietary protein, and C is grams of dietary carbohydrate. From the equation, we can see that carbohydrate is 100% antiketogenic, fat is 90% ketogenic and 10% antiketogenic, and protein is 46% ketogenic and 58% antiketogenic. Therefore, the major determinants of a diet’s ability to produce ketosis are its carbohydrate and fat content, whereas its protein content has only a minor effect on ketosis. The KR can range from 0 (glucose) to 9 (pure fat). Using Withrow’s equation, this study, here, found that a diet with a KR ≥ 1.7 likely results in nutritional ketosis in humans. Therefore, anyone can formulate a low-carbohydrate diet to be ketogenic or non-ketogenic according to their own preference.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

As always, my goal for November 2020 is to eliminate all BG values < 70 mg/dl. In addition, I have just changed my metformin dosage from 1,000 mg at breakfast and dinner to 1,000 mg at breakfast, 500 mg at lunch, and 500 mg at dinner to see if the lunchtime insulin (Humalog) dosage can be reduced in exchange for a slightly higher dose at dinner. I think the lower and more consistent insulin doses can be, the better. I have accepted the fact that there will always be some variation in blood glucose, but if I can continue to keep the mean and standard deviation of blood glucose normal, I will be satisfied. As explained in detail in my new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, injecting insulin in the subcutaneous fat is just not the same as when it is secreted by the beta-cells in the pancreas according to the prevailing blood glucose concentration. I would appreciate anyone who wants to purchase my book and derives some benefit from reading it to leave a positive review on Amazon so that others will see the book when they search for books on T1D. The search rankings in Amazon are based the number of books purchased and the reviews of the book.

Till next time….

#83 September 2020 Update on My T1D Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) using Humalog and Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

My new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, is available in the U.S. on Amazon and internationally on your countries’ Amazon in both Kindle and Print versions. The book incorporates all the new strategies that I learned since my previous book that has allowed me to achieve truly normal blood sugars. It also describes why blood sugars can be so difficult to regulate with T1D without these strategies. The ‘Look Inside’ feature on Amazon will allow you to read the Table of Contents and the first two chapters of the book which gives a complete overview of the book contents. My other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

Lift of the Month – September 2020

Lift Of The Month, September 2020, 79 kg Clean & Jerk, M60 73 kg BW

Glycemic Results For September 2020

In September 2020, my glycemic results were less than optimal due to multiple changes in exercise to accommodate recovery from a wrist injury during a clean & jerk on 9/2/2020. I was able to resume olympic weightlifting toward the end of the month, but am lifting less weight until my wrist fully heals. My mean blood glucose was 99 mg/dl and a standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) was 20 mg/dl. The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for September 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Table 2.3 below. I set my goal standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) to ≤ 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l), although normal is ≤ 25.2 mg/dl (1.4 mmol/l).

The table below shows my bodyweight at the end of the month, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I take to supplement my Tresiba dose to adjust for the variations in my bedtime blood glucose. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime. I added a new metric, coefficient of variation (COV%) of the total daily insulin dose. I am hoping to keep this to a minimum and to see if it correlates with COV% of blood glucose.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the COV%, the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 70 mg/dl, between 70 and 130 mg/dl, and > 130 mg/dl. My goal is to have 100% my of blood glucose values fall in the range 70−130 mg/dl. I did not meet this goal this month. I did not have any hypoglycemic episodes or need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties™) this month.

I skipped measuring breath acetone in September and will resume measuring in October. I use the Ketonix® acetone meter which was gifted to me by Michel Lundell, the inventor of Ketonix®, while I was on Jimmy Moore’s Low-Carb Cruise in 2015. It has been working for the past 5 years and is a very economically efficient way to monitor ketosis. Ketonix® readings between 25% and 50% are consistent with nutritional ketosis.

My current macronutrients are: 46 grams total carbs (6% of energy) of which 14 grams is fiber, 160 grams protein (26% of energy, 2.2 grams/kg BW/day), and 195 grams fat (68% of energy) or 2,534 kcal/day. The ketogenic ratio (KR) of my diet is 1.57. In 1980, Withrow published the equation for the KR as follows: KR = (0.9 F + 0.46 P) ÷ (C + 0.58 P + 0.1 F), where F is grams of dietary fat, P is grams of dietary protein, and C is grams of dietary carbohydrate. From the equation, we can see that carbohydrate is 100% antiketogenic, fat is 90% ketogenic and 10% antiketogenic, and protein is 46% ketogenic and 58% antiketogenic. Therefore, the major determinants of a diet’s ability to produce ketosis are its carbohydrate and fat content, whereas its protein content has only a minor effect on ketosis. The KR can range from 0 (glucose) to 9 (pure fat). Using Withrow’s equation, this study, here, found that a diet with a KR ≥ 1.7 likely results in nutritional ketosis in humans. Therefore, anyone can formulate a low-carbohydrate diet to be ketogenic or non-ketogenic according to their own preference.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

As always, my goal for October 2020 is to eliminate all BG values < 70 mg/dl. I have accepted the fact that there will always be some variation in blood glucose, but if I can keep the mean and standard deviation of blood glucose normal, I will be satisfied. As explained in detail in my new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, injecting insulin in the subcutaneous fat is just not the same as when it is secreted by the beta-cells in the pancreas according to the prevailing blood glucose concentration. I would appreciate anyone who wants to purchase my new book and derives some benefit from reading it to leave a positive review on Amazon so that others will see the book when they search for books on T1D. Apparently, the search rankings are based the number of books purchased and the reviews of the book.

Till next time….

#82 August 2020 Update on My T1D Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) using Humalog and Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

My new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, is available in the U.S. on Amazon and internationally on your countries’ Amazon in both Kindle and Print versions. The book incorporates all the new strategies that I learned since my previous book that has allowed me to achieve truly normal blood sugars. It also describes why blood sugars can be so difficult to regulate with T1D without these strategies. The ‘Look Inside’ feature on Amazon will allow you to read the Table of Contents and the first two chapters of the book which gives a complete overview of the book contents. My other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

This month marks one year of both normal mean blood glucose and standard deviation of blood glucose with the fewest blood glucose readings below 70 mg/dl and only two mildly symptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. In less technical terms, it has been the best year since my diagnosis of T1D.

Lift of the Month – August 2020

Lift Of The Month, August 2020, 88 kg Clean & Jerk, M60 73 kg BW

Glycemic Results For August 2020

In August 2020, my glycemic results were close to my stated goals. My mean blood glucose was 97 mg/dl and a standard deviation of blood glucose was 17 mg/dl. The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for August 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Table 2.3 below. I set my goal standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) to ≤ 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l), although normal is ≤ 25.2 mg/dl (1.4 mmol/l)

The table below shows my bodyweight at the end of the month, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I take to supplement my Tresiba dose to adjust for the variations in my bedtime blood glucose. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime. I increased my caloric intake in June/July and gained weight as a result. My goal was to maximize my caloric intake without exceeding 74 kg BW to provide energy for exercise. I have backed down on my daily caloric intake slightly and will continue that until my weight drops back to between 73 and 73.5 kg. My insulin requirements have decreased as I have been gradually reducing my caloric intake. I added a new metric, coefficient of variation (COV%) of the total daily insulin dose. I am hoping to keep this to a minimum and to see if it correlates with COV% of blood glucose.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the COV%, the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 70 mg/dl, between 70 and 130 mg/dl, and > 130 mg/dl. My goal is to have 100% my of blood glucose values fall in the range 70−130 mg/dl. I did not quite meet this goal this month, although I came pretty close. I did not have any hypoglycemic episodes or need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties™) this month.

The graph below shows my breath acetone measurements for the month of August 2020. I use the Ketonix® acetone meter which was gifted to me by Michel Lundell, the inventor of Ketonix®, while I was on Jimmy Moore’s Low-Carb Cruise in 2015. It has been working for the past 5 years and is a very economically efficient way to monitor ketosis.

Ketonix reading between 25% and 50% are consistent with nutritional ketosis. For August 2020, 4% of the readings were in the range 25−50% and 96% were above that range. My current macronutrients are: 46 grams total carbs (6% of energy) of which 14 grams is fiber, 157 grams protein (25% of energy, 2.2 grams/kg BW/day), and 205 grams fat (69% of energy) or 2,605 kcal/day. The ketogenic ratio (KR) of my diet is 1.63. In 1980, Withrow published the equation for the KR as follows: KR = (0.9 F + 0.46 P) ÷ (C + 0.58 P + 0.1 F), where F is grams of dietary fat, P is grams of dietary protein, and C is grams of dietary carbohydrate. From the equation, we can see that carbohydrate is 100% antiketogenic, fat is 90% ketogenic and 10% antiketogenic, and protein is 46% ketogenic and 58% antiketogenic. Therefore, the major determinants of a diet’s ability to produce ketosis are its carbohydrate and fat content, whereas its protein content has only a minor effect on ketosis. The KR can range from 0 (glucose) to 9 (pure fat). Using Withrow’s equation, this study, here, found that a diet with a KR ≥ 1.7 likely results in nutritional ketosis in humans. Therefore, anyone can formulate a low-carbohydrate diet to be ketogenic or non-ketogenic according to their own preference.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

My goal for September 2020 is to eliminate all BG values < 70 mg/dl. I put my target BG back to 100 mg/dl and I don’t have any new ideas to eliminate the few blood glucose readings < 70 mg/dl or > 130 mg/dl. I still find it annoying that my blood glucose varies as much as it does despite all my efforts to keep it constant. But as explained in detail in my new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, injecting insulin in the subcutaneous fat is just not the same as when it is secreted by the beta-cells in the pancreas according to the prevailing blood glucose concentration. I would appreciate anyone who wants to purchase my new book and derives some benefit from reading it to leave a positive review on Amazon so that others will see the book when they search for books on T1D. Apparently, the search rankings are based the number of books purchased and the reviews of the book.

Till next time….

#81 July 2020 Update on My T1D Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) using Humalog and Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

My new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, is available in the U.S. on Amazon and internationally on your countries’ Amazon in both Kindle and Print versions. The book incorporates all the new strategies that I learned since my previous book that has allowed me to achieve truly normal blood sugars. It also describes why blood sugars can be so difficult to regulate with T1D without these strategies. The ‘Look Inside’ feature on Amazon will allow you to read the Table of Contents and the first two chapters of the book which gives a complete overview of the book contents. My other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

The menu buttons above no longer show the words to which they correspond and I haven’t been able to find a solution. If anyone familiar with WordPress knows how to fix this, please let me know in the comments. Thanks.

Lift of the Month – July 2020

Lift of the Month, July 2020, 65 kg snatch, Keith Runyan, M60 @ 73kg BW

Glycemic Results For July 2020

In July 2020, my glycemic results were close to my stated goals. My mean blood glucose was 99 mg/dl and a standard deviation of blood glucose was 18 mg/dl. The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for July 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Table 2.3 below. I set my goal standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) to ≤ 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l), although normal is ≤ 25.2 mg/dl (1.4 mmol/l)

The table below shows my bodyweight at the end of the month, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I take to supplement my Tresiba dose to adjust for the variations in my bedtime blood glucose. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime. I increased my caloric intake in June/July and gained weight as a result. My goal was to maximize my caloric intake without exceeding 74 kg BW to provide energy for exercise. I have backed down on my daily caloric intake slightly and will continue that until my weight drops back to between 73 and 73.5 kg. My insulin requirements increased as a result of gaining weight. I added a new metric, coefficient of variation (COV%) of the total daily insulin dose. I am hoping to keep this to a minimum and to see if it correlates with COV% of blood glucose.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the COV%, the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 70 mg/dl, between 70 and 130 mg/dl, and > 130 mg/dl. My goal is to have 100% my of blood glucose values fall in the range 70−130 mg/dl. I did not quite meet this goal this month, although I came pretty close. I did not have any hypoglycemic episodes or need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties™) this month.

The graph below shows my breath acetone measurements for the month of July 2020. I use the Ketonix® acetone meter which was gifted to me by Michel Lundell, the inventor of Ketonix®, while I was on Jimmy Moore’s Low-Carb Cruise in 2015. It has been working for the past 5 years and is a very economically efficient way to monitor ketosis.

Ketonix reading between 25% and 50% are consistent with nutritional ketosis. For July 2020, 28% of the readings were in the range 25−50% and 72% were above that range. My current macronutrients are: 38 grams total carbs (5% of energy), 158 grams protein (24% of energy, 2.2 grams/kg BW/day), and 218 grams fat (71% of energy) or about 2,700 kcal/day. The ketogenic ratio (KR) of my diet is 1.77. In 1980, Withrow published the equation for the KR as follows: KR = (0.9 F + 0.46 P) ÷ (C + 0.58 P + 0.1 F), where F is grams of dietary fat, P is grams of dietary protein, and C is grams of dietary carbohydrate. From the equation, we can see that carbohydrate is 100% antiketogenic, fat is 90% ketogenic and 10% antiketogenic, and protein is 46% ketogenic and 58% antiketogenic. Therefore, the major determinants of a diet’s ability to produce ketosis are its carbohydrate and fat content, whereas its protein content has only a minor effect on ketosis. The KR can range from 0 (glucose) to 9 (pure fat). Using Withrow’s equation, this study, here, found that a diet with a KR ≥ 1.7 likely results in nutritional ketosis in humans. Therefore, anyone can formulate a low-carbohydrate diet to be ketogenic or non-ketogenic according to their own preference.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

My goal for August 2020 is to eliminate all BG values < 70 mg/dl. I put my target BG back to 100 mg/dl and I don’t have any new ideas to eliminate the few blood glucose readings < 70 mg/dl or > 130 mg/dl. I still find it annoying that my blood glucose varies as much as it does despite all my efforts to keep it constant. But as explained in detail in my new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, injecting insulin in the subcutaneous fat is just not the same as when it is secreted by the beta-cells in the pancreas according to the prevailing blood glucose concentration. I would appreciate anyone who wants to purchase my new book and derives some benefit from reading it to leave a positive review on Amazon so that others will see the book when they search for books on T1D. Apparently, the search ranking is based the number of books purchased and the reviews of the book.

Till next time….

#80 June 2020 Update on My T1D Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) using Humalog and Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

My new book, Master Type 1 Diabetes: The Simple, Low-Cost Method to Normalize Blood Sugars, is available in the U.S. on Amazon and internationally on your countries’ Amazon in both Kindle and Print versions. The book incorporates all the new strategies I have learned since my previous book that allowed me to achieve truly normal blood sugars. It also describes why blood sugars can be so difficult to regulate with T1D without these strategies. The ‘Look Inside’ feature on Amazon will allow you to read the first two chapters of the book which gives a complete overview of the book contents. My other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

Lift of the Month – June 2020

Keith Runyan, MD June 2020 Clean & Jerk 84 kg @ 73 kg BW

Glycemic Results For June 2020

In June 2020, my glycemic results were close to my stated goals. My mean blood glucose was 98 mg/dl and a standard deviation of blood glucose was 18 mg/dl. The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for May 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Table 2.3 below. I set my goal standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) to ≤ 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l), although normal is ≤ 25.2 mg/dl (1.4 mmol/l)

The table below shows my bodyweight at the end of the month, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I take to supplement my Tresiba dose to adjust for the variations in my bedtime blood glucose. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime. I did have to change my Tresiba dose more than I would like due to some low and high bedtime and fasting blood glucose trends.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the coefficient of variation (COV), the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 70 mg/dl, between 70 and 130 mg/dl, and > 130 mg/dl. My goal is to have 100% my of blood glucose values fall in the range 70−130 mg/dl. I did not quite meet this goal this month, although I came pretty close. I did not have any hypoglycemic episodes or need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties™) this month.

The graph below shows my breath acetone measurements for the month of May 2020. I use the Ketonix® acetone meter which was gifted to me in 2015 by Michel Lundell, the inventor of Ketonix® while I was on Jimmy Moore’s Low-Carb Cruise. It has been working for the past 5 years.

Ketonix reading between 25% and 50% are consistent with nutritional ketosis. For June 2020, 29% of the readings were in the range 25−50% and 71% were above that range. My current macronutrients are: 43 grams total carbs (5% of energy), 161 grams protein (23% of energy, 2.2 grams/kg BW/day), and 237 grams fat (72% of energy) or about 2,900 kcal/day. The ketogenic ratio (KR) of my diet is 1.79. In 1980, Withrow published the equation for the KR as follows: KR = (0.9 F + 0.46 P) ÷ (C + 0.58 P + 0.1 F), where F is grams of dietary fat, P is grams of dietary protein, and C is grams of dietary carbohydrate. From the equation, we can see that carbohydrate is 100% antiketogenic, fat is 90% ketogenic and 10% antiketogenic, and protein is 46% ketogenic and 58% antiketogenic. Therefore, the major determinants of a diet’s ability to produce ketosis are its carbohydrate and fat content, whereas its protein content has only a minor effect on ketosis. The KR can range from 0 (glucose) to 9 (pure fat). Using Withrow’s equation, this study, here, found that a diet with a KR ≥ 1.7 likely results in nutritional ketosis in humans. Therefore, anyone can formulate a low-carbohydrate diet to be ketogenic or non-ketogenic according to their own preference.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

My goal for July 2020 is to eliminate all BG values < 70 mg/dl. I will continue with my target BG at 105 mg/dl and see if that is all that is required and hope my mean BG stays ≈ 100 mg/dl like it did in June and that the number of BG values > 130 mg/dl does not increase too much. I would appreciate anyone who wants to purchase my new book and derives some benefit from reading it to leave a positive review on Amazon so that others will see the book when they search for books on T1D. Apparently, the search ranking is based on the reviews of the book.

Till next time….

#79 May 2020 Update on My T1DM Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) using Humalog and Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

My books are available for purchase: The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes also available on Amazon in print, and my other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print.

Lift of the Month – May 2020

Glycemic Results For May 2020

In May 2020, I turned 60 years of age and celebrated with gratitude that I’m in good health despite having T1D. My glycemic results were close to my stated goals with a mean blood glucose of 98 mg/dl and a standard deviation of blood glucose of 18 mg/dl.

The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for May 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Table 2.3 below. I used as my measure of normality, a standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) of ≤ 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l).

The table below shows my body weight at the end of the month, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I take to supplement my Tresiba dose to adjust for the variations in my bedtime blood glucose. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the coefficient of variation (COV), the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 70 mg/dl, between 70 and 130 mg/dl, and > 130 mg/dl. My goal is to have 100% my of blood glucose values fall in the range 70−130 mg/dl. I did not meet this goal this month, although I came pretty close. I did not have any hypoglycemic episodes or need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties™) this month.

The graph below shows my breath acetone measurements for the month of May 2020. I use the Ketonix® acetone meter which was gifted to me in 2015 by Michel Lundell, the inventor of Ketonix® while I was on Jimmy Moore’s Low-Carb Cruise. It has been working for the past 5 years.

Ketonix reading between 25 and 50% are consistent with nutritional ketosis. For May 2020, 34% of the reading were in the range 25−50% and 66% were above that range. My current macronutrients are: 34 grams total carbs (4% of energy), 159 grams protein (23% of energy, 2.2 grams/kg BW/day), and 230 grams fat (73% of energy). The ketogenic ratio (KR) of my diet is 1.88. I will discuss the KR in a later post and its value in predicting whether or not a particular diet is likely to result in nutritional ketosis. The reference is here.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

My goal for June 2020 is to eliminate all BG values < 70 mg/dl. I will increase my target BG to 105 mg/dl and see if that is all that is required and hope my mean BG stays ≈ 100 mg/dl and the number of BG values > 130 mg/dl does not increase too much.

Till next time….

#78 April 2020 Update on My T1DM Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) using Humalog and Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

My books are available for purchase: The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes also available on Amazon in print, and my other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print.

Lift of the Month – April 2020

Glycemic Results For April 2020

I was satisfied with my April 2020 glycemic results with a mean blood glucose of 98 mg/dl and a standard deviation of blood glucose of 17 mg/dl.

The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for April 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Tables 2.3 below. I used as my measure of normality, a standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) of ≤ 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l).

The table below shows my body weight at the end of the month, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I take to supplement my Tresiba dose to adjust for the variations in my bedtime blood glucose. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the coefficient of variation (COV), the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 70 mg/dl, between 70 and 130 mg/dl, and > 130 mg/dl. My goal is to have 100% my of blood glucose values fall in the range 70-130 mg/dl. I did not meet this goal this month, although I came closer to my goal than I have in the past. I did not need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties™) this month.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

I continued tinkering with a mathematical model to predict insulin doses. I think I am seeking perfection which is not possible. I have promised myself not to make any more changes so that I can actually test the method using a whole month’s worth of data. I will test it this month and hopefully my current method will be the final version.

Till next time….

#77 March 2020 Update on My T1DM Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) using Humalog and Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

My books are available for purchase: The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes also available on Amazon in print, and my other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print.

Glycemic Results For March 2020

I was satisfied with my March 2020 glycemic results with a mean blood glucose of 100 mg/dl and a standard deviation of blood glucose of 19 mg/dl, just short of my goal of ≤ 18 mg/dl.

The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for March 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Tables 2.3 below. I used as my measure of normality, a standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) of ≤ 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l).

The table below shows my body weight at the end of the month, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I take to supplement my Tresiba dose to adjust for the variations in my bedtime blood glucose. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the coefficient of variation (COV), the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 70 mg/dl, between 70 and 130 mg/dl, and > 130 mg/dl. My goal is to have 100% my of blood glucose values fall in the range 70-130 mg/dl. I did not meet this goal this month. I did not need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties™) this month.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

I have been tinkering with a mathematical model to predict insulin doses. While the method provides an estimate, it is not perfect. There is an inherent variability when treating T1D with exogenous insulin, but as long as normal blood sugars can be achieved while being safe, i.e., with minimal hypoglycemia, then I will be satisfied. I will continue testing it this month and hopefully my current method will be the final version.

Till next time….

#76 February 2020 Update on My T1DM Management

This is a monthly update on my glycemic management of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) using Humalog and now Tresiba insulin injections with a ketogenic whole-food diet and resistance and aerobic exercise.

If you feel you might benefit from some individual attention and suggestions for achieving success with blood sugar control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes and/or losing excess body fat, I can assist you with a personal consultation via Skype. See the Coaching page for more info.

In October I did an interview with Ross Wollen on asweetlife.org titled “Interview: Dr. Runyan is the Diabetic Ketogenic Athlete.” You can read it here.

I wrote an article for DietDoctor in July titled “What you need to know about a low-carb diet and your kidneys.“ You can read it here

My books are available for purchase: The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes also available on Amazon in print, and my other book, Conquer Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet, is also available on Amazon in print

Glycemic Results For February 2020

My February 2020 glycemic results were excellent except for having more blood sugars < 74 mg/dl than my goal of < 5%. My monthly blood glucose variability, as measured by standard deviation, was a new low at 16 mg/dl, since my diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in 1998.

The graph below shows all the blood glucose measurements and daily insulin dose totals for February 2020.

My blood sugar goals are shown in Tables 2.3 and 2.4 below. I used as my measure of normality, a standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) of less than 18 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l). This value was measured in 434 metabolically healthy subjects in China as reported in this study.

The table below shows my monthly mean body weight, mean total daily insulin dose, mean basal insulin dose, mean bolus insulin dose, and the mean bolus insulin dose for each meal and the bedtime bolus insulin dose which I started using a few months ago to try to improve my fasting blood sugar while keeping the basal insulin dose constant. Despite this I did have to decrease my Tresiba dose by 1 IU this month to address fasting low blood sugars. Diluting my Humalog 5:1 helps to give precise doses with meals and at bedtime.

The table below shows my blood glucose variability data including the monthly mean blood glucose, the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), the coefficient of variation (COV), the calculated HbA1c, and the percentage of blood glucose values < 74 mg/dl, between 74 and 126 mg/dl, and > 126 mg/dl. As mentioned, my percentage of blood glucose values < 74 mg/dl was higher than my goal of < 5%. I did not need to take any glucose tablets (or Smarties) this month.

My total daily insulin dose was lower this month and on par with previous months.

Table 2.2 below shows the mean and 95th percentile of the interstitial glucose (IG) and standard deviation of the interstitial glucose (SDIG) of 564 nondiabetic subjects as measured by CGM from the five studies referenced below.

The references for these five studies are shown below.

In February, I tinkered with a mathematical model to predict insulin doses. This month, I will test it and hope that it will be the final version. It is clear that there will always be some inherent variability in blood sugars when treating T1DM with exogenous insulin, but as long as normal blood sugars can be achieved while being safe, i.e., with minimal hypoglycemia, then I will be satisfied. I expect this mathematical approach will only be useful after one has established a consistent schedule of meals, exercise, and sleep, i.e. factors known to affect insulin sensitivity.

Till next time….

#75 The 2020 Kick Sugar Summit Starts Soon

 My friends over at the Kick Sugar Summit headquarters have done it again!

They have lined up the who’s who in the world of sugar and sugar addiction. It is intended to help sugar lovers find the information and inspiration they need to break up with refined carbohydrates.

It is well known that refined carbs are the root cause of modern lifestyle diseases, and no amount of healthy food, medical intervention or pharmaceutical can undo the damage sugar does. There is only one way out, only one way to keep sugar from undermining your efforts to get healthy, and that is to kick it. Whether you have a bad habit or a true addiction, this summit is for you.

I am thrilled to be a part of this event and to share the stage with world experts from around the world. You can catch my interview on Day #5, Friday, March 6th, 2020.

 If you are curious to know what kicking sugar can do for you, join us!

 It is 100% free and launches live on Monday, March 2, 2020.

Register here: https://www.kicksugarsummit.com

%d bloggers like this: